Copyright question (General Discussion)

Copyright question // General Discussion

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brandon

Jul 26, 2001, 3:21pm
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How exactly do you copywrite something? and umm...how do you become a =
company?

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<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>How exactly do you copywrite =
something?&nbsp;and=20
umm...how do you become a company?</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>

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goober king

Jul 26, 2001, 3:52pm
To answer the first question: Just make something. As soon as you finish something,
it's copywrited. And the only time copywrites even matter is when someone else says
"I made this!" when, in fact, *you* made it. You just need to be able to prove that
you made it first.

As for the second question: Start one! :)

[View Quote] --
Goober King
If no one told people how to do business, do you think they could figure it out? :P
rar1 at acsu.buffalo.edu

faber

Jul 26, 2001, 4:22pm
You might want to notice that its actually

a Copyright, not a CopyWrite.

Its your right to control who may copy what you created. The copy right.

Faber


"goober king" <rar1 at acsu.buffalo.edu> schrieb im Newsbeitrag news:3B605878.180B7AAA at acsu.buffalo.edu...
> To answer the first question: Just make something. As soon as you finish something,
> it's copywrited. And the only time copywrites even matter is when someone else says
> "I made this!" when, in fact, *you* made it. You just need to be able to prove that
> you made it first.
>
> As for the second question: Start one! :)
>
>
> --
> Goober King
> If no one told people how to do business, do you think they could figure it out? :P
> rar1 at acsu.buffalo.edu

john viper

Jul 26, 2001, 4:59pm
lol :-)

Anyways in America the best way to prove that you cam up with it first is to
register the copyright... I have no clue how to do it but it proves without
a shadow of a doubt that you did it first.

-John

"faber" <Walter at Knupe.de> wrote in
news:3b605fff at server1.Activeworlds.com:

> You might want to notice that its actually
> a Copyright, not a CopyWrite.
>
><snip>
>
> "goober king" <rar1 at acsu.buffalo.edu> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
> news:3B605878.180B7AAA at acsu.buffalo.edu...

_____________________________________________
Jeff Tickle (John Viper, #296714)
jviper at jtsoft.net
http://www.jtsoft.net

brandon

Jul 26, 2001, 5:29pm
thats exactly what i ASKED, but no people just sya you automaticly have it
copyrighted. I know you have to register it somewhere. and i asked about the
business becuase i though you have to register to be an ofcial business

[View Quote]

agent1

Jul 26, 2001, 6:14pm
Anything you create is pretty much under copyright. Don't need to be a business or big corporation to do that.

-Agent1

[View Quote]

kah

Jul 26, 2001, 6:26pm
you can register a copyright at the patent office. I think it costs money,
so unless you have something worth a billion dollars that would be easily
reproduced be other I don't think it's worth it... to create a company, just
start doing something, and go to your local city hall for information of
this kind, they're there to tell you...

KAH

[View Quote]

goober king

Jul 26, 2001, 7:35pm
That's because that's all you need to have a copyright! If you make something, you
can go right ahead and throw up that little (C) on it. If you want to, you can also
register it so that you can make it truly and ultimately official, but you don't
*have* to. If you do that, then you can put a (R) instead of a (C).

As for registering a business, who would you register it with? :P It's not as if
there's some big book somewhere with a list of all "official" companies. Just start
one up, and you've got yourself a business!

[View Quote] --
Goober King
You answer their question, and they still complain! :P
rar1 at acsu.buffalo.edu

kah

Jul 26, 2001, 7:50pm
keyboard code for nice copyright icon ©: alt + 0169 keyboard code for nice
reg. trademark icon ® alt + 0174 keyboard code for nice trademark icon: alt
+ 0153

KAH
PS. any name like for example Activeworlds is automaticly a trademark, but
it's smart to register company names...

[View Quote]

john viper

Jul 26, 2001, 8:30pm
No no no, you misunderstood me. If you make it, it is your intellectual
property, and copyrighted as such. However, just saying in court "I made it
before you" does not usually hold up well, and registering your copyright
with the government is the best way to prove this. You do not have to be a
big official business to do this, and you are not actually registering a
business. I think it is cheap, maybe $10 or $15 to register a copyright,
but you do not have to have a business.

-John

"brandon" <brandon at my.activeworlds.com> wrote in
news:3b606fa4 at server1.Activeworlds.com:

> thats exactly what i ASKED, but no people just sya you automaticly have
> it copyrighted. I know you have to register it somewhere. and i asked
> about the business becuase i though you have to register to be an
> ofcial business

_____________________________________________
Jeff Tickle (John Viper, #296714)
jviper at jtsoft.net
http://www.jtsoft.net

agent1

Jul 26, 2001, 8:40pm
Actually, I'm almost certain that they're not automatically trademarked... Trademarks *have* to be registered, I think.

-Agent1

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m a r c u s

Jul 26, 2001, 9:06pm
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Whoever has more money and can win their case in court will be the =
"originator" of said property. If you are rich, consult a lawyer, if =
you are poor hope someone rich will fund your ideas and maybe you can go =
into venture capital.

Even if you come up with a killer idea and can support it, someone up =
the food chain will see it and well, it's bye bye idea.

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<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Whoever has more money and can win =
their case in=20
court will be the "originator" of said property.&nbsp; If you are rich, =
consult=20
a lawyer, if you are poor hope someone rich will fund your ideas and =
maybe you=20
can go into venture capital.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Even if you come up with a killer idea =
and can=20
support it, someone up the food chain will see it and well, it's bye bye =

idea.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>"brandon" &lt;<A=20
href=3D"mailto:brandon at my.activeworlds.com">brandon at my.activeworlds.com</=
A>&gt;=20
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builderz

Jul 26, 2001, 11:01pm
What is Copyright Protection? - http://whatiscopyright.org/
10 Big Myths about copyright explained -
http://www.templetons.com/brad/copymyths.html
United States Copyright Office - http://www.loc.gov/copyright/

Builderz
Stuff-X - Bot & World Hosting Services
http://www.stuffx.com/aw/
PGP Key ID: 0xAC0E7073 (for non-commercial use)

[View Quote]

internal affairs

Jul 27, 2001, 12:35am
No you can't just make up a company "out of thin air", you have to register
it with the state. The process usually requires a lawyer present and it
costs about $100. The process includes a search of all other company names
in the state and also the legal documents nesscary.

goober king

Jul 27, 2001, 12:52am
heh I knew that KAH, but in case you didn't notice, they're a tad hard to distinguish
in plain text. The parentheses version is a bit easier to read :)

[View Quote] --
Goober King
Maybe HTML would be have helped in this one...
rar1 at acsu.buffalo.edu

brandon

Jul 27, 2001, 1:21am
so does that mean if i offer a service but call my self a company i will get
in trouble? What if i offer a service under a name but not refer to myself
as a company. Things like Stuff-X for example (not that i know if they
registered or not) if they do business with money , etc aren;t they
considered a business even if they dont call themselves it? please give more
details

[View Quote]

internal affairs

Jul 27, 2001, 3:49am
Yes Stuff-X is a registered corporation in the state of Pennsylvania. The
owner of Stuff-X pays income taxes associated with the revenue they
generate. There is another option - Free Enterprise - which I am not to
familiar with. From what I understand, you declare yourself independent and
therefore do not have to file for 1040. I will get more information on this
matter soon.

[View Quote]

sw chris

Jul 27, 2001, 5:09am
Um... I thought you registered a copyright at the Copyright office (you can
find instructions on how one one of those big ol' government websites.. not
sure which one... just search for copyright office) and you register
inventions at the patent office... I dunno.

SW Chris

[View Quote]

moria

Jul 27, 2001, 6:21am
Actually there are many books which do exactly this:) both national and
international:) The tax people check them regularly, and file reports on
income recieved against business name in different countries, and in most
countries it is a criminal offence not to be in them if you are doing
buisiness as a buisiness. If you are doing some homework, like Objects for
aw that you get paid for, then often just declaring all the revenue on tax
forms will exempt you from the legal side, until you achieve a certain
revenue, but if that revenue is not seperately declared, and is found, then
there are huge questions to answer:)

To call yourself a buisiness is to give yourself a legal title.. dont use
it unless you own it:)

Moria

[View Quote] >It's not as if
> there's some big book somewhere with a list of all "official" companies.

john viper

Jul 27, 2001, 8:17am
> you can register a copyright at the patent office. I think it costs
> money, so unless you have something worth a billion dollars that would
> be easily reproduced be other I don't think it's worth it... to create
> a company, just start doing something, and go to your local city hall
> for information of this kind, they're there to tell you...

You wouldn't copyright something that you have invented, that one WOULD go
to the patent office. And if you have built something... anything... if you
know not how to reproduce it quickly and inexpensicely, someone else in the
world can and will, unless you get the thing parented. Then perhaps you
could work with the other person or something like that and end up making
kajillions...

I just figure if you made it, it should be yours unless you specifically
give it to someone else.

_____________________________________________
Jeff Tickle (John Viper, #296714)
jviper at jtsoft.net
http://www.jtsoft.net

john viper

Jul 27, 2001, 8:19am
"internal affairs" <ji0414 at starlinx.com> wrote in
news:3b60d365 at server1.Activeworlds.com:

> No you can't just make up a company "out of thin air", you have to
> register it with the state. The process usually requires a lawyer
> present and it costs about $100. The process includes a search of all
> other company names in the state and also the legal documents nesscary.

I think there is a way to make an LLC or something like that... costs a lot
less, and no lawyer.

_____________________________________________
Jeff Tickle (John Viper, #296714)
jviper at jtsoft.net
http://www.jtsoft.net

goober king

Jul 27, 2001, 10:28am
There's a difference between a copyright and a patent, though. A patent is mainly for
inventions, and lets the creator of that invention make, use, and sell the invention
however s/he wishes. A copyright, on the other hand, is for *anything* that can be
made, whether it's books or art or music or whatever. It's main purpose is to tell
the world "Hey! I made this and you didn't!" Some people try to use a copyright to
restrict distribution of their works, but that's just plain stupid. :P

But still, you can copyright *and* patent something, but it's usually not necessary.

[View Quote] --
Goober King
Mmmm... semantics...
rar1 at acsu.buffalo.edu

kah

Jul 27, 2001, 12:38pm
US thingy is called something like U.S. Patent & Trademark Agency (PTA) I
think it was something like pta.gov... they handle all that stuff...

KAH

[View Quote]

kah

Jul 27, 2001, 12:40pm
why do you think there are 2 types of trademark? ;-))

KAH

[View Quote]

faber

Jul 27, 2001, 1:15pm
Its little simpler even:

a patent applies to a method, while a copyright applies to an implementation.

Faber



"goober king" <rar1 at acsu.buffalo.edu> schrieb im Newsbeitrag news:3B615DE3.88021993 at acsu.buffalo.edu...
> There's a difference between a copyright and a patent, though. A patent is mainly for
> inventions, and lets the creator of that invention make, use, and sell the invention
> however s/he wishes. A copyright, on the other hand, is for *anything* that can be
> made, whether it's books or art or music or whatever. It's main purpose is to tell
> the world "Hey! I made this and you didn't!" Some people try to use a copyright to
> restrict distribution of their works, but that's just plain stupid. :P
>
> But still, you can copyright *and* patent something, but it's usually not necessary.
>
[View Quote]

agent1

Jul 27, 2001, 2:11pm
Never heard of there being two "types" of trademark. Something either is or isn't a trademark. A trademark is only for things like names, though, so they have to be registered.

-Agent1

[View Quote]

kah

Jul 27, 2001, 2:57pm
hmmm... have you been bit by a lame newbie recently? a trademark used like
this: MyProductNameT is a trademark, it HAS NOT been registered, but it's
still a trademark. a trademark like this: MyCompanyName­® is a registered
trademark, the owner has paid 350USD (if it was registered in the U.S) for
it. that's two types of trademark.

KAH
PS. I know this, cuzz I've messed around the patent & trademark site...

[View Quote]

agent1

Jul 27, 2001, 3:57pm
Ahh... anyone can use T (TM) or (SM), but (R) can only be used if the mark is registered... got that straight now.

Anyone else that wants to learn about Patents and Trademarks can look at http://www.uspto.gov/

-Agent1

[View Quote]

wing

Jul 27, 2001, 4:29pm
Registering a copyright at $10 each isn't all that cheap when you have various mechanisms to copywrite. For example, a commentary
website. You register stuff like your scripts, and just pop up the (C) symbol on the articles, until someone starts reproducing them
or the ideas expressed show up in the media. THEN you register that particular article.
[View Quote]

john viper

Jul 30, 2001, 9:49pm
"faber" <Walter at Knupe.de> wrote in
news:3b618590 at server1.Activeworlds.com:

> Its little simpler even:
>
> a patent applies to a method, while a copyright applies to an
> implementation.
>
> Faber


Very well put!

_____________________________________________
Jeff Tickle (John Viper, #296714)
jviper at jtsoft.net
http://www.jtsoft.net

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